The Rosetta Key – William Dietrich

What first comes to mind just after finishing this book ?? A mix of real history, drama, thriller, Indiana Jones, romance, war, peace, and don’t forget – different countries – France, Egypt, England, and a few thrown in to make it interesting, all in one book.

Reminds me of everything I mentioned, had to get this out before I went to bed… It is now 3:12am. Ethan Gage is what you would call a Savant. He has tutelage under Benjamin Franklin, and many others on his quest…. a book, with a lot of secrets, which can be used for good and evil.

While in Egypt, he learns of a secret hidden language that was possibly hidden by the Knight’s Templar – Masons. And on this quest of his, he befriends women and men alike in this fast paced thriller I had a very hard time of putting down. Then there is also the matter of betraying the English troops, the French troops, befriending them and making enemies a few times over in search for this article that everyone seems to want.

Through many wars, you would think that Ethan would have succumbed to his captors, or at least been fatally wounded… No, it is like he has 9 lives of a cat, or more, escaping danger at every given opportunity, and making things up, using Ben Franklin’s inventions and thoughts on things as he advances closer and closer to his target. Shocking and awing as the story progresses.

Masterful, thrilling, breathtaking at every single moment of the book. I don’t believe that there was a stagnate part in the whole book.

What is interesting, the author has woven fact with a bit of fiction, to keep you mesmerized, and utterly wanting more. All of the ruins, places are current, the detail that he has taken was precise, and reading it, you could imagine it in your mind while reading the book.

I would recommend this author highly.


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Harper Collins

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One thought on “The Rosetta Key – William Dietrich

  1. Pingback: Double Post – The Dakota Cipher and The Barbary Pirates – William Dietrich « Serendipitous Readings

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